Sunday, January 31, 2010

Go forth and blog...

Last week, the Associated Press reported that Pope Benedict XVI urged priests to use multimedia tools, to do what we do --- have a presence where are readers are.

The Pope, though, according to the article, also “praised new ways of communicating as a "gift to humanity" when used to foster friendship and understanding."

"That doesn't mean that (every priest) must open a blog or a Web site. It means that the church and the faithful must engage in this ministry in a digital world," Monsignor Claudio Maria Celli, who heads the Vatican's social communications office, told reporters. "At some point, a balance will be found." Celli, 68, said that young priests would have no trouble following the pope's message, but, he joked, "those who have a certain age will struggle a bit more."

2 comments:

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Anonymous said...

Very Interesting!
Thank You!